flickr

Creative Commons remix culture - a practical example

Autumn Leaf

As you might know I publish some of my photos in my photoblog and on flickr under a Creative Commons license.

A very cool example of the so-called remix culture "happened to me" recently — one of the photos I posted on flickr was used as album art for a music CD, namely J. D. Warrick's "Going, a. The Leaving".

Btw., if you want to learn more about remix culture, Creative Commons etc. I can really recommend Larry Lessig's Wizards of OS 4 Keynote titled "The Read-Write Society" (OGG video: 144 MB, MP4 video: 224 MB).

Some of my photos on flickr

Quake Level
Oldtimer
Escher lookalike architecture
Yes, I finally got a (free) flickr account and uploaded some of my favorite photos from my photoblog to my flickr page.

This has several reasons:

  • Increased exposure to the public + I hope for many ratings and comments from other flickr users.
  • I wanted to get a flickr account anyways in order to be able to comment on other people's photos.
  • As my photos are Creative Commons licensed they can be "remixed". See the flickr remix group for some nice examples. I'll probably create some remixes of other people's photos, too.

Note: My photoblog will not die, I will continue posting new stuff there. I'll just use the flickr page for some selected shots.

There's an RSS feed for the flickr page, if you want track my photos.

Revver - Got video? Get paid!

Hm, more food for my video iPod which hasn't arrived yet.

Revver ("a Flickr for video") is a new video publishing community site which allows you to upload, share, watch, and tag videos for free. You need a special upload tool for uploading videos (there's a Windows version, a MacOS X version, and a Java version which probably works on Linux).

They intend to give the creators of the videos some money by attaching a clickable advertisement frame (the so-called RevTag™) at the end of each video. Everytime a viewer clicks the ad, the video creator gets some money. While this might be a great idea, it still leaves me with a strange feeling (the ad is not on a webpage, it's appended to the video itself!)...

Some noteworthy details:

  • They currently have a size limit of 100 MB per video.
  • They don't censor the videos except for obvious copyright violations (porn yes, illegal stuff no).
  • You get 50% of the money and Revver gets the other 50%.
  • You need a PayPal account to get the money.
  • "Your videos stay on Revver for as long as they generate a reasonable amount of revenue" (no unlimited hosting, it seems).
  • The videos are automatically put into iTunes and formatted to work with the video iPod.
  • All videos are automatically converted into the mov format.
  • The default license for the videos is the Creative Commons ShareAlike license (you can probably choose others, I didn't check).

More information is in their first blog post, and in the FAQ.

A final quote from the blog post:

It’s a new game, we’re thrilled to be in it, and we tip our hats bigtime to the Ourmedia crew, the YouTube crew, the Participatory Culture crew, the Creative Commons crew, and all the other crews that came before us.

All in all this looks quite promising, and I'm curious how it will develp and grow...

(via Boing Boing)

The infinite flickr

The infinite flickr slideshow. Better than TV, and more... ehm... recursive?

(via Beer and Speech)

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