dmcrypt

RAID5 + dm-crypt + LVM + ext3 Debian install and benchmarks

OK, so I've setup a RAID5 at home because I'm getting tired of failed disk drives and data losses.

Some notes:

  • The system consists of 3 x 300 GB IDE drives in software RAID5 (standard Linux kernel and mdadm), thus ca. 600 GB usable storage space.
  • I've used the stock Debian installer to set up all of this, no custom hacks or anything needed.
  • Each drive is on an extra IDE bus/controller (1x onboard/internal, 2x on an PCI IDE controller card), as broken IDE disks (lacking hot-swap capabilities) often take down the whole IDE bus with them; it's not a good idea to put two disks on one IDE bus.
  • The software stack is: RAID5 at the botton, dm-crypt on top of that to encrypt the whole RAID, LVM on top of that to partition the system into /, /usr, /var, /tmp, /home, and swap.
  • /boot is on an extra 1 GB partition (replicated on each drive) as GRUB doesn't work on RAIDed disks and I want to use GRUB, not LILO. GRUB is also installed on the MBR of each drive, so if one of them fails, the other two can still come up.
  • I installed and configured smartmontools to check the status of the drives, and hddtemp to check their temperature.
  • Stability tests so far: While the system is running, pull out one of the IDE drives (yes, they're not hot-swappable and that may not be such a good idea, usually). The system survived without data loss. Time for rebuilding the array: ca. 1 hour. Second test: while the system is running, pull the plug. The system survived that, too.

Some stats from bonnie++ if anybody cares:

Version  1.03       ------Sequential Output------ --Sequential Input- --Random-
                    -Per Chr- --Block-- -Rewrite- -Per Chr- --Block-- --Seeks--
Machine        Size K/sec %CP K/sec %CP K/sec %CP K/sec %CP K/sec %CP  /sec %CP
bonsai           2G 26727  72 39426  19 16690   7 28725  65 34164   7 215.3   0
                    ------Sequential Create------ --------Random Create--------
                    -Create-- --Read--- -Delete-- -Create-- --Read--- -Delete--
              files  /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP  /sec %CP
                 16 +++++ +++ +++++ +++ +++++ +++ +++++ +++ +++++ +++ +++++ +++
bonsai,2G,26727,72,39426,19,16690,7,28725,65,34164,7,215.3,0,16,+++++,+++,+++++,+++,+++++,+++,+++++,+++,+++++,+++,+++++,+++

(Now, if I only knew what all those figures mean ;-)

No, neither the software RAID5, nor the dm-crypt layer nor LVM cause any measurable performance degradation whatsoever (from my subjective feeling). I don't care enough to measure anything. The CPU is idling all the time.

Power consumption is rather high (partly due to the mainboard and CPU, but also because of the disks + fans) and the system is pretty loud, which both sucks on the long run. I plan an ultra-silent, ultra-low-power RAID5 with 2.5" disks attached via USB to a (silent, low-power) NSLU2 for later.

HOWTO: Disk encryption with dm-crypt / LUKS and Debian [Update]

A few weeks ago I published a small HOWTO for using loop-aes to encrypt your hard drive, usb thumb drive etc.

As I have bought a new 300 GB external USB disk drive on Friday, I have tried something new this time: disk encryption using dm-crypt / LUKS. It has been suggested to me multiple times that dm-crypt is superior to loop-aes, however I didn't get a real reason. Yes, it doesn't require any kernel patches and is easier to setup. But has any serious cryptographer looked at it sharply, yet? Did it withhold his eye contact?

Anyways, here's how I encrypted my 300 GB drive. I largely followed the guide at the EncryptedDeviceUsingLUKS wiki page...

  1. Make sure you run Linux 2.6.16 or better. Previous versions suffer from an implementation problem which affects the security of dm-crypt, see Linux Kernel dm-crypt Local Cryptographic Key Disclosure.
  2. Enable the following options in your kernel:

    • Code maturity level options
      • Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers
    • Device Drivers -> Multi-device support (RAID and LVM)
      • Device mapper support
      • Crypt target support
    • Cryptographic options
      • AES cipher algorithms
  3. Overwrite the whole drive with random data in order to slow down attacks on the encryption. At the same time perform a bad blocks scan to make sure the hard drive is not going to die too soon:
    badblocks -c 10240 -s -w -t random -v /dev/sdb
    Replace /dev/sdb with whatever is correct on your system. If you're really paranoid, and are willing to wait one or two days, do this:
    dd if=/dev/urandom of=/dev/sdb
  4. Install the required packages:
    apt-get install cryptsetup
    The current cryptsetup in Debian unstable already supports LUKS, which was not the case a while ago, if I'm not mistaken. So Debian testing or stable will most probably not work!
  5. Create one or more partitions on the drive:
    cfdisk /dev/sdb
    I created one big 300 GB partition, /dev/sdb1.
  6. Setup LUKS:
    cryptsetup --verbose --verify-passphrase luksFormat /dev/sdb1
    Enter a good passphrase here. Don't spoil the whole endeavour by chosing a stupid or short passphrase.
  7. Open the encrypted device and assign it to a virtual /dev/mapper/samsung300gb device:
    cryptsetup luksOpen /dev/sdb1 samsung300gb
  8. Create a filesystem on the encrypted device:
    mkfs.ext3 -j -m 1 -O dir_index,filetype,sparse_super /dev/mapper/samsung300gb
    I used ext3 with some optimizations, see mke2fs(8).
  9. Mount the encrypted partition:
    mkdir /mnt/samsung300gb
    mount /dev/mapper/samsung300gb /mnt/samsung300gb
    That's it. Everything you write to /mnt/samsung300gb will be encrypted transparently.
  10. For unmounting use:
    umount /mnt/samsung300gb
    cryptsetup luksClose /dev/mapper/samsung300gb

After unmounting, nobody will be able to see your data without knowing the correct passphrase. Drive is stolen? No problem. Drive is broken, and you want to send it in for repair without the guys there poking in your data? No problem. You leave the USB drive at home and some jerk breaks into your house, steals your drive, rapes your wife, and kills your kids? No problem. Well, sort of, but you get the idea ;-)

There's more things you can do, thanks to LUKS: have multiple passphrases which unlock your data, change/add/remove passphrases as you see fit, etc.

Comments?

Update 2006-04-17: You have to use cryptsetup from unstable if you want LUKS support. cryptsetup in testing does not support this (thanks Ariel).

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