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Encrypted SMS Solutions?

Dear Lazyweb,

I was recently thinking about SMS encryption (you know, the short messages sent from your cell phone). Or MMS encryption for that matter. Are there any Free Software solutions to implement such a thing, based on well-known crypto primitives and proven implementations thereof?

From a quick glance I could not find anything usable, only lots of commercial, closed-source "solutions" which cost money and are basically crap.

I was thinking about hacking together a small Java application (so that most modern phones can run it) which basically asks for a password and pipes your text through AES before sending the SMS. On the receiver's side, you enter the same password and get to see the plaintext. That's pretty much it.

If you want something more elaborate you can use public-key crypto (basically embed GnuPG or similar into the application), but the above should be fine for most uses.

Anyways, I do not want to start implementing something like this if there are other, more mature projects out there which do the same...

Why you'd want to do this (other than simple paranoia, or the fact that governments and other institutions are spying on everyone these days, whether they're allowed to or not)? Well, one good reason for SMS encryption is when you're using some kind of SMS gateways, e.g. a website which gives you 2-3 free SMS per month if you sign up with them and give them tons of personal data. That alone is crappy enough, but you don't want their admins to be able to read and store all your SMSes in addition (which consist of simple plain-text, transmitted though HTTP in this case!). Neither should any local or remote scriptkiddy who knows how to use a sniffer be able to read your private SMSes.

Solution: Write the text in your favorite text editor, pipe it through aespipe (for example), cut'n'paste the result in the web form of the SMS service. The receiver does everthing backwards and you're done.

How to dump your BIOS/LILO/root password as plain text [Update]

This is old news by now, but still interesting IMHO. Jonathan Brossard has posted an article on BugTraq which gives a pretty good introduction to the inner workings of the BIOS (with lots of links to more detailed resources) as well as known vulnerabilities of the BIOS password mechanism.

The most interesting part is when he explains that the BIOS doesn't seem to erase its own keyboard buffer before it hands over control to the operating system. Also, current OSes (Linux, Windows, *BSD, etc.) don't seem to clear that buffer either.

This may not sound dangerous, but it actually allows anyone who can read the contents of your RAM, starting from address 0x041e, to view the keyboard buffer contents. And this buffer contains the BIOS password you type in when booting your machine (if you set/use a BIOS password, of course).

This one-liner (executed as root) should let you view your password as plain text:

dd if=/dev/mem bs=512 skip=2 count=1 | hexdump -C | head

(Only every second character belongs to the password, the rest are key scan codes, I think).

I also noticed that this same buffer also contains your LILO password, too! The same is probably true for passwords of other boot loaders such as GRUB, but I didn't test that.

Yes, reading this part of the RAM usually requires root privileges in Unix-like OSes, but as the security problem is OS-independant other OSes (e.g. DOS, or older Windows versions) might be directly affected.

But even on more secure OSes this plain-text storage of the BIOS/boot loader passwords might be a problem. Combine this with some Firewire insecurities and attackers with physical access to your machine (e.g. your unattended laptop, while you are on the toilet) might be able to read your BIOS/LILO passwords even though you locked your machine. I haven't yet tried this, but I'm pretty sure it's possible. Please post the results here if you try this.

(via Stefan 'Sec' Zehl)

Update 2006-01-09: It seems that when you use software suspend (swsuspend2) the RAM area can/will also contain your root password! Thanks nelson for reporting.

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