My Drupal article has been published in the German Linux-Magazin


I am somewhat proud to announce that an article written by me about the free CMS Drupal, has been published by the German Linux journal Linux-Magazin. It's available in their Sonderheft Linux-Magazin 2/2005: Web Edition (a special issue about web publishing).
Unfortunately the article is not available online, so you'll have to buy the magazine to read it.

My article gives a broad introduction to Drupal, covering the installation (and some troubleshooting) as well as the basic concepts like nodes, users, roles, permissions, themes, modules etc. I briefly introduce some important contributed modules, explain how one usually installs modules and give a short overview of what will be new in the next release, Drupal 4.6. There's also a tiny section about the history of Drupal, and I provided links to some interesting Drupal-stuff like the Custom Blocks repository (which has recently moved, so the URL in the article is wrong), the Drupal Theme Garden and the Drupal API documentation.

If you happen to have read the article, I'd be happy to get some feedback.

Drupal 4.6 release candidate

The first release candidate of of Drupal 4.6 is available. You can already check out the soon-to-be-released new version of Drupal, but bear in mind that some bugs and issues will have to be resolved until the final release.

There will be some great new features and improvements, check out the ChangeLog.

Your garbage can is spying on you!

Yes, 1984 seems a lot like a reality. Nowadays even your garbage cans spy on you.

Debian Developers Map

Seems like I'm a bit fanatic about maps lately... Here's a world map of where the Debian developers live:

Debian Developers World Map

It's generated from anonymized location data of the developers using the xplanet package.

Keeping Your Life in Subversion

Joey Hess, a fellow Debian developer, keeps his life in subversion:

For the past five years, I've checked every file I've created and worked on, every email I've sent or received, and every config file I've tweaked into revision control.

He has done this for an even longer time using CVS (see his other article "CVS homedir") and explains the advantages of using SVN over CVS. He successfully converted his CVS repositories to SVN and they now amount to several gigabytes of content.

I'm quite impressed with this, and - having already used SVN for several code projects - decided to use it for my homedir now, too. Today, I checked in my .bashrc, .bash_logout, .bash_profile, .procmailrc, .muttrc, .slrnrc, .xsession, .vimrc, .signature and a few other files into SVN, more will follow later.

Also, quite important for me, my local .todo file (currently a 130 KB plain-text file with more or less important TODO items) is now in SVN. I imagine I'll have a lot of fun when I browse the history of my .todo file in a few years ;-)

One thing I already have in SVN for quite some time is my websites. Before uploading any file (via FTP, scp, whatever) I check it in on my local computer. As most of my sites are database-driven (using wikis or CMSes), I also periodically get the database dumps and check them into SVN.
This provides me with the additional benefit, that I can test any changes to my websites on my local computer, before they become public. If I mess up, I can always restart with a simple rm -rf foo && svn up foo.

For the future I plan to also put my /etc directory as well as the /etc of my server(s) into version control.

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